Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Active users of the LIRC - October 2017

Image result for congratulations

ACTIVE USERS OF THE LIRC
(October 1 - 31, 2017)
Following  Active Users are eligible for one extra library card for the month of  November 2017.
Sr. No.
Member
No. of Transactions
1
SHAILIN SHAH
15
2
VATSAL SOLANKI
14
3
NEVGI ANIRUDDHA VIVEK VIDYA VIVEK NEVGI
14
4
SHRUTI SURESHAN RAJANI
14
5
AISHWARYA NAMBIAR
14
6
SAYALI MARTAL
13
7
PINTO CALVIN CRAIG SAVIO ELAINE
13
8
SUPRITH UCHIL
13
9
RISHABH DUBEY
13
10
SONALI PARAB
12
11
JAYBHAY SHEETAL SHANTILAL MANISHA
12
12
CRASTA RYAN RONALD LEENA
12
13
HRISHIKESH MAHESH TELANG
12
14
MORAES ROSHAL SURESH LILLY
12
15
ANTONY ALEX LEENA
12
16
RAJESH PARSHURAM PRASAD
11
17
JOSHI SHUBHAM PRAMOD VINITA
11
18
TEJASWARARAO MOTAMARRI
11

Friday, October 13, 2017

Publishers and societies take action against Research Gate’s copyright infringements

Publishers and societies take action against Research Gate’s copyright infringements

Following unsuccessful attempts to jointly find ways for scholarly collaboration network ResearchGate to run its service in a copyright-compliant way, a coalition of information analytics businesses, publishers and societies is now left with no other choice but to take formal steps to remedy the illicit hosting of millions of subscription articles on the ResearchGate site.
Exchanging research and collaborating has been an integral part of academic work for centuries. Today, cooperation across geographic boundaries and disciplines has become easier than ever with online tools making connections in real-time, opening up infinite ways for breakthrough discoveries. These are true achievements and publishers of academic research welcome them and have helped to facilitate them.

To read more, visit http://www.responsiblesharing.org/coalition-statement/ (accessed on October 13, 2017)

Copy + Paste = Delete

Copy + Paste = Delete

No more copying or padding up assignments with information off the net. A new UGC guideline asks institutions to set up committees to cross check for copying

THOUGH PLAGIARISM WILL NOW BE PUNISHABLE UNDER THE NEW UGC GUIDELINES, IT IS NOT A LEGAL OFFENCE
It starts with copying homework from a classmate at school because you were too lazy to do yours. Then you begin copying a few lines from Wikipedia to pad up an assignment.
For a disturbingly large number of Indian students, plagiarism – the practice of taking someone else’s idea or work and passing it as your own – is part of academic life. It’s ignored by school and college until almost the post-graduate level, where regulations are stricter.
Now, the University Grants Commission (UGC) is taking active steps to promote academic integrity and prevent plagiarism in academics. A set of rules drafted last month make it necessary for higher education institutes across the country to set up an Academic Misconduct Panel to investigate assignments and projects submitted, for plagiarism.
The panel will comprise faculty, MPhil (master of philosophy) and PhD (doctor of philosophy) students. “Every student submitting a thesis, dissertation, term papers, reports or any other such documents to the higher education institution shall submit an undertaking indicating that the document has been prepared by him or her and that the document is his/her original work and free of any plagiarism,” reads the draft.
The draft also recommends that institutes conduct awareness programmes each semester to teach students and staff the importance of proper attribution of information, seeking permission of the author where necessary, acknowledgement of source compatible with the needs and specificities of disciplines.
Teachers welcome the move. “The education system gives Indian students very little time to research,” believes Kanchana Mahadevan, head of the department of philosophy at Mumbai University. Students end up not realising that they need to use the right sources and credit it when using material from the web and another person’s work. As Uday Salunkhe, group director of WeSchool, Matunga puts it, “Most students have no idea of the seriousness of the consequences. It has become the new normal.”
WHOSE LINE IS IT ANYWAY?
When Raj*, 23, was writing an essay to get admission in a humanities course in the UK, he took a couple of paragraphs from an essay online to impress the university with his language skills. “I figured that universities abroad get thousands of applications and won’t have no time to check mine for plagiarism,” he says. “I was terribly wrong. I got caught and was blacklisted from the university and lost a year. I learnt my lesson the hard way.”
Mahadevan of Mumbai University has encountered student plagiarism on a few occasions. “The students in these cases were looking for short-cuts [since they had not attended class regularly] and instant appreciation,” she says. “They didn’t even realise that plagiarism is ethically unacceptable.” It was only during classroom presentation of the assignments, when their peers presented creative and original work, that they realized what they had done.
It is a major problem, especially in medical colleges, says Dr TP Lahane, dean of Grant Medical College, Byculla. “Several students just copy the entire research paper at post-graduate level and submit it,” he says. “When found, they are punished. In most cases though, it’s difficult to know because they are just too many open sources of research both online and offline.”
Though the menace will now be punishable under the UGC guidelines, it is not a legal offence, says Mahesh Bhagnari, managing director at Bhagnari and Co, patent and trademark law firm in Fort. “For somebody to file a suit against you for plagiarism, you should have used the copy for commercial use and earned a profit, which students don’t do. Also, the laws are enforced on citizens above 18 years of age and undergraduates are often younger.”
It means that colleges and universities have the bulk of the responsibility to take action against plagiarism.
SMALL STEPS
Appropriating another person’s work was never very difficult, says Matthew Raggett, headmaster of The Doon School in Dehradun. “I attribute it to the curriculum that focuses on content and does not teach you to ask questions and find answers to them on your own,” he says. His solution: Start early. “It is important that academic honesty is enforced upon students in secondary schools saving them from resorting to plagiarism in high school and college.”
Delhi University does not receive many complaints against copied theses and assignments. But it uses software that students and staff can use to check plagiarism, says Deepika Bhaskar, deputy dean of research at the university. Each department has password-protected access to it and it scans all submitted assignments before they are sent for correction. All the papers at post-graduate level come with a certificate stating what percentage of matter is similar to what is already available in the public domain.
“Hence to create awareness about the menace, we have made announcements in all the departments to check all assignments for plagiarism,” says Bhaskar.
Dr Lahana is optimistic about the UGC guidelines. “They will encourage institutes to ensure that a thesis, dissertation, term paper, report, publication or any other documents is free of plagiarism,” he says.
Around the world, schools and colleges have been relying on Turnitin, a programme that crosschecks academic material for plagiarism. Scanned documents show how much of the text, images or research has already appeared elsewhere. At India International School in Bengaluru, Selina Krishnan, director of academics goes a step ahead. “We guide students on how to acknowledge and cite what has been taken from a source they have researched,” she says. “With proper guidelines in place, plagiarism can be avoided.”

Source: Hindustan Times dated October 11, 2017

Friday, October 6, 2017

A Must Read - "My Magical School" by Dr. Abhay Bang

This article is written by Dr. Abhay Bang in which he is sharing his experience studying at Nayee Taleem School set up by Mahatma Gandhi on how he studied mathematics not sitting in class but by constructing a water tank in school's cowshed, how they learnt cooking nutritious food by themselves by cooking in school kitchen in a very limited budget etc.
You will love this article, do read it when you get time.
Dr. Abhay Bang is a social activist and researcher in the field of community health. I am sharing with you the PDF of the article and also the digital copy the booklet.

https://archive.org/details/MyMagicalSchool-English-Dr.AbhayBang


http://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/magic-school-eng-drbang.pdf

Information Courtesy: Ms. Navyatha Uchil
Source: http://mylibraryinternshipprogram.blogspot.in/

Celebration of Reading Inspiration Day


Active users of the LIRC - September 2017



ACTIVE USERS OF THE LIRC
(September 1 – 30, 2017)
Sr. No.
Member
No. of Transactions
1
CRASTA RYAN RONALD LEENA
13
2
MISHRA PRIYA VINOD REKHA
12
3
PINTO GLEN JOHNSON LEENA
12
4
GAIKWAD SHREYA SHIVAJI SANGITA
12
5
ANTONY ALEX LEENA
11
6
PINTO RODNEY ROMAN VEENA
11
7
SHANBHAG ANUSHREE ANIL VEENA
10
8
SALUNKE NEHA RAJENDRA SNEHA
10
9
TRIVEDI BINA DINESH NEETA
10
10
SHIVANI ROY
10
11
VISHWAJEET MISHRA
10
12
HRISHIKESH MAHESH TELANG
10
13
SHRUTI SURESHAN RAJANI
10
14
SHAILIN SHAH
10
15
PATIL SHUBHAM SUJAN ASHA
10
16
NIRAJ YADAV
10
17
TARUN YADAV
9
18
VINIT NEOGI
9
19
PEREIRA COLLIN CHRISTOPHER WAVENEY
9
20
RISHABH DUBEY
9
21
NAIK HARSHIKA ARUN HARSHA
9
22
NEVIL JEEVAN
9
23
GUPTA PIYUSH GOVIND SADHANA
9
24
RUTUJA GIRMAL
9
25
PINTO CALVIN CRAIG SAVIO ELAINE
9
26
BISHT SHIVANI MEHARBAN SINGH BISHT BIMLA BISHT
9
27
MORAES ROSHAL SURESH LILLY
9
28
PRASAD KAUSHAL CHHOTELAL MAYA
9
29
MIHIR PARIKH
9
30
TEJASWARARAO MOTAMARRI
9
All the above Active Users are eligible for one extra library card for the month of October 2017.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Campus hires get roles in hot technologies

Campus hires get roles in hot technologies
Bengaluru:


Shortage Of Talent In Fields Like Big Data Forces Cos To Recruit Freshers & Train Them
Campus placements and available job roles for engineering college graduates are going through a big change, given the emergence of a variety of new technologies that are disrupting every industry . The soaring demand for jobs in big data and analytics, artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, digital marketing, and mobile and software development, is pushing companies to offer these roles to those coming out of college campuses. These were roles that were earlier offered primarily to midlevel professionals.
There were around 12,000 jobs available for freshers in India in each of these skill sets during the one year ending August 31, according to data collated from job platforms by online education provider Simplilearn. The numbers are almost double that for roles in cloud computing, quality management, and IT services, which were the leading roles previously .
“These numbers are a combination of what we have seen and the data gathered from our own platform and job listing websites like Naukri and Indeed. We looked at skills that industries have been talking about,“ said Kashyap Dalal, chief business officer at Simplilearn. Dalal said the largest employers of these skills are the top players in the IT services and BFSI (banking, financial services & insurance) spaces. But just about every company , which has recognised that these skills are essential to understand and serve customers better, are hiring for these roles. These include the many MNCs with engineering and R&D centres in India, and the slew of new retail MNCs entering to tap into India's engineering talent. “I am seeing companies like Samsung going to colleges like BITS and IITs to hire for these roles,“ said Kaushik Satish, co founder at hiring firm Belong.
Harishankaran K, co-founder and CTO of HackerRank, which conducts recruitment tests on campuses for many product companies, including Adobe and Flipkart, says every single company that they work for, including startups, is trying to hire for these roles.
Companies are forming their own teams even in roles like digital marketing that were earlier outsourced to third parties. Other hot roles are in internet of things (IoT) and design of the user interface and user experience. The move to campuses for these roles is primarily because of the shortage of skills in the general technology ecosystem. The roles require basic knowledge in technology skills like advanced Excel, big data, open source data warehousing software Hive, programming languages Python and Java, search engine optimisation (SEO), and Android. Digital marketing requires people to have a basic knowledge of Google AdWords and SEO.
Some educational institutions teach a few of these skills. But a lot of the main skills are acquired postrecruitment, with in-house training. “Very few colleges have curriculum defined for such roles, so companies look for general problem-solving abilities -like ability to handle data and aptitude for algorithms,“ said Harishankaran.
The salary range for those taken into these roles is in the same Rs 2-4 lakh bracket that other freshers fall in. But the scope to jump to higher salary bands with just a few years of experience is high.
Satish says such disproportionate jumps happened three years ago in product management roles, those who are responsible for the strategy , road map and feature definition of a product or product line. “Many students in the top B-schools were then being hired for product manager roles, especially in e-commerce,“ he says.


To read the detailed article, click here.
Source: The Times of India dated October 2, 2017



Tuesday, October 3, 2017

GATE 2018 Important Dates for Aspirants

Ref. Link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2kqrqyN1YIJTlF5Y09NaS1yUms/view


GATE Online Application Processing System (GOAPS) Website Opens
Friday
1st September 2017
Last Date for Submission of (Online) Application (through website)
Thursday
5th October 2017
Last Date for Requesting Change of Examination City (an additional fee will be applicable)
Friday
17th November 2017
Admit card will be available in the Online Application Portal (for printing)
Friday
5th January 2018
GATE 2018 Examination
Forenoon: 9.00 am to 12.00 noon
Afternoon: 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm
Saturday
Sunday
Saturday
Sunday
3rd February 2018
4th February 2018
10th February 2018
11th February 2018
Announcement of the Results in the Online Application Portal
Saturday
17th March 2018

Active users of the LIRC - October 2017

ACTIVE USERS OF THE LIRC (October 1 - 31, 2017) Following   Active Users are eligible for one extra library card for the mont...