Saturday, October 6, 2018

Reading Inspiration Week 8 to 15 October 2018



×
To commemorate the birth anniversary of our Ex.President and Visionary Scientist, Late Dr.A.P.J.Abdul Kalam on 15th October, the Learning and Information Resource Centre is organizing the following activities:
Day
Activity
8th -9th October, 2018
In-House Exhibition of Books
10th October,2018
Take Away of CDs
11th-12th October,2018
Take Away of Donated Books
Display and Sale of Book Bank Weeded out Books
15th October, 2018
Display of books on Late Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam

Monday, October 1, 2018

ACTIVE USERS OF THE LIRC SEPTEMBER 2018


ACTIVE USERS OF THE LIRC
( September 1st to 3oth September  2018)
 All the below Active Users are eligible for one extra library card for the month of 
October. 2018.


Sr. No.
Member
No's.of Transactions
1
BHAGAT SIDDHI PREMCHAND ARUNA
33
2
LOBO ANDREA KARLTON ALICE
30
3
POOJARY ROSHANI SHIVRAM GUNAVATI
26
4
GUPTA PRADEEP FULCHAND RENU
26
5
KESARKAR KOMAL PRAKASH PRATIKSHA
25
6
SHAIKH SARA IMTIAZ VALENTINA
25
7
JAIN DHRUVI MAHENDRA PRIYANKA
24
8
CRASTA RYAN RONALD LEENA
24
9
JAYBHAY SHEETAL SHANTILAL MANISHA
24
10
MASCARENHAS RACHEL NOEL JACINTA
24

Monday, September 24, 2018

NPTEL Online Courses

NPTEL (National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning) is a joint initiative of the IITs and IISc. Through this initiative, we offer online courses and certification in various topics.

Online course: Free for all, Certification exam: For a nominal fee. Learn anytime, anywhere! Only requirement: Interest and enthusiasm to learn :)
Ongoing July-Dec 2018: 269 courses: Click here to view the course list.

Tentative Course List for Jan-April 2019 courses: Click here to view the course list.

Exam registration for 269 courses are Closed.

AICTE Approved FDP Course List 
Click here to view the course list.

For New Users:
1.Click on the tab "Login" seen on the top right-hand corner.
2.Use a Google account enabled email id to login.
3.Choose your desired course.Go through the details in the course page, fill the details and click on the "Join" button to Enroll
4.If the course has content uploaded, you will be able to see it.
Once these steps are carried out, you will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Timelines & Guidelines for Candidates : Click here

The start/end dates and exam dates are as follows:


Start/End/Exam Date 4 weeks8 weeks12 weeks4 weeks8 weeks
Start of course13-Aug-186-Aug-1830-Jul-1827-Aug-1827-Aug-18
End of course7-Sep-1828-Sep-1819-Oct-1821-Sep-1819-Oct-18
Exam datesOct -7, 2018
(2 Sessions: 9am-12 noon; 2pm-5pm)
Oct -28, 2018
(2 Sessions: 9am-12 noon; 2pm-5pm)

GATE 2019: Access Previous years Question Papers at NPTEL

To access, previous years GATE papers, please visit the following URL:

https://nptel.ac.in/gate_paper.php

GATE Online Application Processing System (GOAPS) is open for receiving applications


GATE Online Application Processing System (GOAPS) is open for receiving applications.

https://appsgate.iitm.ac.in is the only official GATE 2019 online application portal. !!!
Important Notices

·         Do you have any Corrections to be Incorporated in the completed application? GOAPS Portal opens for corrections from25/9/2018  

·         Increase in application fee will be effective during the extended period, from September 24, 2018 (Monday) to October 1, 2018 (Monday)  

Application Fee with Dates
Examination Centres in India
During
Sept 1-23, 2018
During the Extended
Period
(Sept 24 – Oct 1, 2018)
SC/ST/PwD/Female Candidates
 750
1250
All other Candidates
 1500
 2000
Examination Centres outside India (All Candidates)
Addis Ababa, Colombo, Dhaka & Kathmandu
US$ 50
US$ 70
Dubai and Singapore
US$ 100
US$ 120

·         In case, the candidate has made multiple payments, only the successful payment will be considered for GATE 2019 application.

·         For unsuccessful payment(s), candidates will get the refundable amount automatically.

·         Application Status: Under Scrutiny

·         If the status of your application is “Under Scrutiny”. You need not worry. Wait till the scrutiny team process your application. Only those candidates whose applications need to be rectified in photo/signature/supporting documents, will be contacted by email and SMS. The scrutiny process will continue even after the application portal is closed.

·         The receipt of SMS and Email OTPs by the candidates is taking a little longer time, as the number of applicants using the GOAPS site is drastically increased for the past two days. Therefore, requests the candidates to go ahead with filling the application and payment without waiting for the OTP verification. The OTP verifications can be done even after the payment.


Important Dates

GATE Online Application Processing System (GOAPS) Website Opens
Saturday
1st September 2018
Closing Date for Submission of (Online) Application
Sunday
Extended to
23rd September 2018, 18:00 hrs
Extended Closing Date for Submission of (Online) Application
Monday
1st October 2018
Last Date for Requesting Change of Examination City (an additional fee will be applicable)
Friday
16th November 2018
Admit Card will be available in the Online Application Portal (for printing)
Friday
4th January 2019

GATE 2019 Examination

Forenoon
9:30 AM to 12:30 Noon (Tentative)
Afternoon
2:30 PM to 5:30 PM (Tentative)
Saturday
Sunday
2nd February 2019
3rd February 2019

Saturday
Sunday

9th February 2019
10th February 2019
Announcement of the Results in the Online Application Portal
Saturday
16th March 2019

Source: http://gate.iitm.ac.in/ (accessed on September 25, 2018)

A look at India’s deep digital literacy divide and why it needs to be bridged


A look at India’s deep digital literacy divide and why it needs to be bridged

We need to start by understanding digital literacy rates for the public and private sector, and also education sector. We need data for the status, the progress and the proliferation of digitisation across regions, gender and social strata.

By: FE Bureau | New Delhi | Published: September 24, 2018 1:22 AM

Bridging the great Indian digital literacy divide
Always on, always available, always enabled—this is the world of Generation C (“connected”) who will have grown up in a primarily digital world by 2020, according to a recent report by PwC. Computers, internet, mobile phones, texting, social networking are an integral part of their world. Their familiarity with technology and reliance on mobile communications will transform the way this generation works, entertains, collaborates, consumes and creates. Experts predict that 26 billion or more sensors and devices will be connected to the internet by 2020, bringing in an era of machine intelligence that is already re-framing the world of humans. While technologists and researchers prepare for the future of digitisation, it is imperative to develop a framework that will build a solid foundation for countries, governments, organisations and individuals to navigate this change.
To prepare for the wave of digital transformation, building digital skills is as essential as creating digital infrastructure, starting with a progressive focus on digital literacy and general literacy. Those who lack either will find themselves sidelined. This has been recognised as UNESCO’s Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG4), where one of the monitoring indicators calls on countries to track digital literacy skills. But we have to ask ourselves: What exactly does it mean to achieve a minimum level of digital skills? A good starting point would be to understand digital literacy, India’s position on digital literacy rates, the importance of digital literacy and, indeed, of the digital Indian.
India’s digital literacy ladder
While India asserts itself as one of the world’s largest growing economies, a recent report by the Digital Empowerment Foundation indicates that 30% of our population lags on basic literacy and thrice that for digital literacy. The government launched Digital India in 2015 to digitally empower every citizen. While its potential benefits are unquestionable, challenges remain, including delayed infrastructure development, bandwidth availability, personal computer penetration and the capacity to scale.
If India were to optimise the opportunities emerging out of the modern digital economy, we would need to leverage the full potential of our digital investments, through a standardised set of programmes implemented at various levels via the machinery of governments, corporates and education institutions.
Here are five early approaches for the near and long term:
Definition: A consistent definition of ‘digital literacy’ is required for the purposes of data collection, analyses and measurements by the government and its administrators. The American Library Association says: “Digital literacy is the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, evaluate, create and communicate information, requiring both cognitive and technical skills.” Hiller Spires of North Carolina State University views digital literacy in three buckets: (1) Finding and consuming digital content; (2) creating digital content; (3) communicating or sharing. India’s National Digital Literacy Mission trains people to operate digital devices, and to access the government’s e-governance services at its basic levels. Each of these renders a different operational plan, and clarity is required for progress.
Direction: A national digital literacy policy to monitor the digital divide across states and cities recognising the multidimensional nature of digital literacy. There are three challenges here: First, prioritising based on a grass-roots approach; second, aligning with sectoral and national growth targets; and third, remaining internationally relevant both in the near and long term. The policy also needs to answer questions on whether the role of digitising a country is only the job of the government or whether public-private partnerships (PPP) can help move the needle. The questions of digital equity are key: Can digitisation reach the haves and have-nots? Which generation will benefit the most from a digital India? We need a roadmap bridging the digital divide. The first question to answer, of course, has to be: What comes first, digital India or digital Indian?
Design: A framework to establish an ideal categorisation of creation and consumption of content. From an architect to a blogger, there is a tremendous volume of work happening in India that contributes to the digital output of the country. The potential impact of all the digital creation in India is underestimated. While consumption of content is evident across demographics, the need for increased creation is of significant importance to an emerging digital economy.
Data: If any transformational change needs to begin from the grass-roots level, we need to start by understanding digital literacy rates for the government, the public and private sector, and surely the education sector. We need data for the status, the progress and the proliferation of digitisation across regions, gender and social strata. We also need stronger studies to identify the opportunity for every citizen to experience the value technology can bring to the way they live, work and exist.
Drive: The inevitable and rapidly evolving human-machine relationship will mean that either we are driven by technology, or that we drive the change. In fact, early technology touchpoints with children will mean that parents, teachers and educational institutions will need to adopt a set of methodologies to achieve an appropriate balance of creation and consumption of technology in the formative years of children. Yes, these future digital Indians will be the flag-bearers of the prospects of our country and investing in them now will help reap the full benefits of India’s digital dividend.
By- Meeta Sengupta & P Krishnakumar. Meeta Sengupta is a writer, speaker and education advisor. P Krishnakumar is senior vice-president & general manager, Consumer & Small Business, Dell India